4th Grade Vocabulary - The Complete Vocabulary List

abandon: 1. a lack of control or restraint 2. loss of inhibitions 3. exuberance 4. surrender to one's natural impulses

abbreviation: 1. a shortened form of a name, phrase or word 2. the act of shortening something

abide: 1. to accept 2. to put up with; to tolerate 3. to conform

ability: 1. the capacity to do something 2. a skill or talent in a specific area

abnormal: 1. strange 2. not usual or typical 3. not what is considered to be normal

abrupt: 1. brusque or curt in behavior or speech 2. unexpected or sudden, most often in an unpleasant or shocking way 3. steep

absent: 1. not present in a certain time or location 2. non-existent 3. missing

absolute: 1. complete, definite or perfect 2. not limited in any way 3. unadulterated

absurd: 1. silly or ridiculous, especially in a laughable way 2. illogical or totally untrue 3. difficult or impossible to believe

academy: 1. a professional organization that is created to regulate or spur interest and development in a specific field 2. a school that provides special training in a particular field

acceleration: 1. an increase in speed or rate 2. the ability of something to go faster

accompaniment: 1. something that accompanies something or someone else 2. music that accompanies a singer or the main tune

accompany: 1. to go along with 2. to be associated with 3. to go somewhere with someone

account: 1. an explanation or description of a specific event or situation 2. a narrative 3. the reasons behind a specific event or action

accurate: 1. meticulous or giving careful consideration to the details 2. exact 3. free from errors and mistakes

acrid: 1. a strong, bitter or stinging smell which often creates an unpleasant smell in one's throat 2. a bitter or sharp taste

adaptation: 1. the act of modifying something so that it better fits one's needs 2. change; adjustment

adult: 1. a person or animal that is fully developed or fully grown 2. a mature person or animal

affect: 1. to impact someone emotionally or mentally 2. to produce a change in

amass: 1. to gather or collect goods of any kind over a long period of time 2. to accumulate

amiable: pleasant and friendly; good-natured and likable

anecdote: a short, often funny story, especially about something some happening, usually personal or biographical

annex: 1. to take control or possession over a piece of land without permission and often by the use of force 2. to add or attach 3.

annual: 1. occurring each year 2. payable on a yearly basis or calculated over a year 3. yearly

apparent: 1. clear and able to be seen 2. obvious; evident 3. easily understood

appendix: 1. additional material that is found at the end of a book, an essay or another written piece 2. added information

appreciate: 1. to become more valuable or increase in worth 2. to be grateful or thankful for 3. to understand the true meaning of a situation

appropriate: 1. to take possession or control of something 2. to steal 3. to set aside or to devote to a specific purpose

apt: 1. exactly suitable; appropriate 2. likely to do something; having a tendency to do something 3. quick to learn or understand

area: 1. a geographical region 2. part of a surface or space 3. a subject or field of study

artisan: 1. a craftsman 2. a worker who has a specific skill and is able to make things by hand 3. a company or person that produces small batches of high quality goods

assemble: 1. to put something together by joining its parts 2. to bring people together into one single group

assist: 1. to support or help; to aid

assume: 1. to believe that something is true without proof 2. to take on a role or responsibility 3. to adopt an idea

assure: 1. to assure someone that something is true, in hopes of getting rid of doubts 2. to confidently promise; to pledge 3. to guarantee 4. to make secure or safe

author: 1. the creator of something 2. the person who writes a document 3. the person responsible for an action

authority: 1. power; the ability and right to control 2. the person or group that is in charge of a person, group or region 3. an expert on a specific subject 4. jurisdiction 5. official permission

benefit: 1. an advantage 2. a gift or payment from an employer to an employee 3. a payment from an insurance company or social welfare program 4. something intended to help 5. an event designed to raise money for someone or for a cause

bequeath: 1. leave or give (personal property) by will 2. pass (something) on to another; hand down

bigot: 1. a person who is intolerant of views other than his or her own 2. a person with a closed-mind

burnish: 1. to make something brilliant or shiny by rubbing it 2. to polish

capable: 1. able to do something 2. quite good at a certain task; skilled

capacity: 1. the ability to do something 2. the maximum number of things that a place or object can hold

cease: 1. to stop doing something; to quit 2. to discontinue 3. to come to an end

challenge: 1. to question or express objection to 2. to test someone 3. to invite someone to take part in a debate or competition; to dare

channel: 1. a route through which water flows or can flow 2. a television or radio station 3. a course of direction through which actions or ideas pass

chapter: 1. a section of a book or a written work 2. a branch of a society or group 3. a stage in a person's life

chart: 1. a drawing or illustration which displays information in an easy to understand way; a graph 2. a detailed map used for navigation of the sea or air

chide: 1. express mild disapproval of (someone) 2. scold mildly so as to correct or improve; reprimand

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civil: 1. not related to the church or military, but rather the ordinary people of a country 2. secular 3. polite or courteous

clamor: 1. a loud outcry, uproar, demand, complaint or shouting 2. a loud noise that continues for a long time

classic: 1. typical; traditional; famous 2. extraordinarily good 3. timeless; considered to be good or exceptional over a long period of time

colleague: 1. a coworker 2. someone you work with in the same profession or organization

commit: to do something

communicate: 1. to transmit something, such as energy or an illness 2. to transmit information to others through written, verbal or non verbal words or signals

community: 1. a group of people living in the same area or region 2. a group of people who share common interests 3. the greater public

complex: 1. complicated and not easy to understand 2. involving or made from many different parts

compound: 1. to increase 2. to combine 3. to make something worse 4. to pay interest

compromise: 1. a settlement of differences by mutual concessions 2. reduce the quality, value, or degree of something 3. endanger the interests or reputation of

compute: 1. to calculate 2. to determine by using a calculator or computer

concentrate: 1. to focus on something 2. to strengthen something 3. to bring things or people together in a common location

concept: 1. an idea or a notion 2. a plan 3. an experimental model for a future product

concern: A matter of interest or importance

conclude: 1. to finish 2. to terminate or cause something to come to an end 3. to deduce or to infer based on what one has seen or heard

conduct: to lead or guide

conflict: 1. a fight or a disagreement between two or more parties 2. a struggle 3. an incompatibility

consider: to think carefully

considerable: 1. quite large; substantial 2. worthy of recognition or consideration 3. noteworthy

consist: 1. to be composed of 2. to be inherent 3. to be compatible

consistent: 1. regular 2. not changing over time 3. constantly acting or behaving the same way

constant: 1. unchanging 2. firm or resolute 3. persistent; continuing over a long period of time 4. loyal

constitutional: 1. permitted by the constitution of a country, group or business 2. related to the constitution of a country, group or business

constrain: 1. to keep back; to confine 2. to restrain; to limit 3. to force; to oblige

construct: 1. to create or to form 2. to build; to put pieces together to form a whole object 3. to combine smaller pieces to develop something new

construction: 1. the act or business of building things, especially structures

consume: 1. to eat 2. to use; to use up 3. to totally destroy

consumer: 1. a person who purchases goods or services

contemporary: 1. from or existing in the same time period 2. modern

context: 1. the circumstances surrounding something 2. the words before and after something that help explain what it means 3. the circumstances or situation in which something happens, which help to explain it

contract: 1. to get smaller; to shrink 2. to make smaller 3. to hire someone to work under a contract 4. to get

contrary: 1. opposite or completely different 2. obstinate 3. unfavorable

contrast: 1. the act of finding differences between two or more things 2. a difference between two or more things

contribute: 1. to write for a newspaper or a magazine 2. to give goods, money or time and effort to a person or group in order to help them

contribution: 1. something one gives or does in order to help reach a shared achievement 2. a donation 3. a specific tax payment

convention: 1. a formal political agreement 2. a gathering or meeting of people or professionals with a shared interest 3. a social custom

core: 1. the center of something 2. the most important or essential part of something

counterfeit: 1. to forge a copy of something, often for illegal or dishonest reasons 2. to create a high-quality copy of something with the intention of defrauding someone

create: 1. to invent something; to develop something new 2. to cause or bring about

credit: 1. money that is given to someone with the understanding that it will be paid back with interest 2. recognition or praise

culture: 1. behaviors, beliefs, and standards that are shared between one large group of people or a society 2. art, such as music, literature, dance, theater, etc.

currency: 1. money; any other medium of exchange

cycle: 1. an extended period of time 2. a bi- or tri- cycle 3. a series of events which repeat over time

data: 1. information, facts or figures about a specific subject that is often used to make a decision 2. information used by a computer

decade: 1. a period of ten years 2. any series or group of ten

decline: 1. a fall in the number of something; a reduction 2. the act of reducing in number 3. a downward slope

decoy: 1. an object used as a decoy or to bait people or animals 2. something used to lure people or animals to trick them into a dangerous situation

defile: 1. to spoil something by making it less pure; to corrupt 2. to pollute or make something dirty

define: 1. to explain exactly what something means 2. to describe what a word means 3. to clarify 4. to limit

definition: 1. a clear outline of something 2. the meaning of a word or phrase

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deliberate: 1. to carefully debate or think about something serious 2. to thoughtfully weigh the available options

demonstrate: 1. to deliberately show or prove 2. to make clear

deny: 1. to say that something is not true 2. to claim one is not guilty of something; to not admit 3. to not let someone have something

depict: 1. show (someone or something) in a picture, drawing, painting, photograph, etc. 2. describe (someone or something) using words, a story, etc.

deride: speak of or write about (someone or something) in a way that shows you think they are stupid, unimportant, or useless; make fun of; ridicule

design: 1. a sketch or a plan that shows what something will be like when it is produced or constructed 2. a pattern or plan

despite: 1. hatred or malice 2. injury

detect: 1. to note or to feel something 2. to discover or catch 3. to note the presence of

deteriorate: 1. to get or become worse 2. to depreciate 3. to disintegrate over time

detrimental: 1. causing damage or injury 2. harmful

deviate: 1. to stray from the established course or standards 2. to digress

device: 1. a contraption used to perform specific tasks 2. an explosive, like a bomb 3. a method used to do something

devote: 1. to dedicate time or resources to something 2. to set apart

differentiate: 1. to determine or recognize the difference between two or more things; to distinguish 2. to make one thing unlike another

diversity: 1. difference or variety 2. the state of having people from different races and cultures gathered together in one space or organization

divert: 1. to distract 2. to make something move in a different direction or on a different course 3. to use for a different purpose than the original 4. to amuse or entertain

divulge: make (something private, secret, or previously unknown) known to public; disclose; reveal

document: 1. to record something on paper or in digital format 2. to provide written evidence

draft: 1. the first draft or copy of something 2. a sketch 3. a rush of air through a building or space

drama: 1. a play that is performed in a theater, on television or on the radio 2. a literary work that deals with a serious subject 3. the art of performing

dramatic: 1. sensational 2. pronounced 3. extremely sudden 4. extreme

drone: 1. a male bee whose only purpose is to mate with the queen bee 2. a low and monotonous buzzing or humming 3. an aircraft that does not have a pilot on it and is controlled by someone on the ground 4. a lazy person who lives off of others

economic: 1. cheap 2. pertaining to the economy of a country or region 3. related to the system of buying and selling goods and services

economy: 1. the money and production of goods and services of a specific political region 2. thriftiness or careful management when spending money

edifice: 1. a building or structure that is large and impressive 2. any sort of well-established system

edit: 1. to revise a document and change whatever errors one sees 2. to produce a book or document by gathering different works together

eliminate: 1. to get rid of 2. to abolish 3. to remove

eloquent: 1. persuasive in speaking or writing 2. characterized by fluent and persuasive speech 3. movingly or vividly expressive

emaciated: 1. extremely thin due to great hunger or illness

empathy: the ability to understand and share the feelings, thoughts, attitudes, experiences, and emotions of another

emphasis: 1. the importance that is specifically placed on something 2. stress

empirical: relying on or derived from observation or experiment rather than theory or pure logic

emulate: try to equal or excel (someone or something you admire), typically by imitation

enable: 1. to make someone able to do something 2. to give someone the tools or resources to do something 3. to allow someone to do something

encompass: 1. form a circle or ring around; encircle; surround 2. include different types of people or things; include comprehensively; contain 3. enclose; envelop

encounter: 1. to find someone or something unexpectedly 2. to stumble across 3. to face

endorse: 1. to publicly declare one's support for something 2. to acknowledge a document by signing it

energy: 1. the effort or power needed to do something 2. heat, electricity, light or the resources used to produce power

engage: to occupy the attention

enhance: intensify, increase, or improve the quality, amount, extent, or strength of something, as in cost, value, attractiveness, effectiveness, etc.

ensure: 1. to make sure that something happens or happened 2. to guarantee 3. to secure or make safe

environment: 1. all of the conditions and circumstances that surround a specific person, animal or thing 2. the surroundings

equation: 1. a math problem 2. the act of considering one thing to be the same as another

equipment: 1. supplies or tools needed to complete a task

erode: 1. to eat away or wear away something 2. to slowly deteriorate 3. to reduce something

erosion: 1. the gradual corroding or eating away of a subject 2. deterioration

evaluate: 1. to judge 2. to closely examine something before determining its value

eventual: 1. happening at a time in the future that has not been specified

evidence: 1. material that shows someone is innocent or guilty of something 2. material that proves something

expand: 1. to add details or information 2. to grow larger 3. to cause growth or to make larger

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expansion: 1. growth 2. the act or process of getting larger 3. an increase in size or number

export: 1. to sell or send abroad 2. to introduce or transmit an idea from one country into another

expose: 1. make (something) visible by uncovering it 2. lay open to danger, attack, harm, etc.; leave unprotected or without covering 3. make known, disclose, or reveal (something hidden, dishonest, etc.) 4. (expose oneself) display one's sexual organs in public

external: 1. from or located out the outside; outer 2. coming from the outside or an outside source 3. peripheral

facilitate: 1. to help make something happen 2. to assist 3. to make something easier

falter: 1. to move or speak in an unsteady, awkward manner 2. to stop doing something, even for just a moment 3. to lose strength

federal: 1. related to the central or national government 2. related to the system of federalism, a system in which states or provinces and central governments share power

fickle: 1. likely to change one's opinion; not constant 2. unstable; frequently changing

finance: 1. money that is used to pay for a large and expensive project 2. the money that a person, company or nation has 3. the management of money

financial: 1. related to money or finance

flagrant: 1. (of a bad action, situation, person, etc.) shockingly noticeable or evident; obviously offensive; glaringly bad; notorious; outrageous 2. notorious; scandalous

fledgling: 1. a young bird just fledged 2. a young, inexperienced, or underdeveloped person or organization

flexibility: 1. the ability or willingness to make changes 2. easily bent 3. adaptability

flexible: 1. pliable; capable of being manipulated 2. able to change or be modified 3. able to be bent

flippant: showing a lack of proper respect or seriousness about a serious subject or situation, in an attempt to be funny or to appear clever, especially when this annoys other people

focus: 1. the center point of something 2. the center of attention 3. the main point

forlorn: 1. pitifully sad and lonely; unhappy and neglected; abandoned or left behind 2. nearly hopeless; desperate

formula: 1. a fixed or standard way of doing something 2. mathematical symbols that express a rule or a fact

forsake: 1. to desert or abandon someone who needs you 2. to give up something special or important

foundation: 1. the base on which something is built 2. an organization that deals with social issues or projects 3. the underlying principle or basis

function: 1. a duty or an activity that one must perform 2. a formal event 3. a purpose

furrow: 1. a deep wrinkle in one's skin 2. a line in the ground that was dug by a plow 3. a long line or channel in any surface

gait: 1. a particular way or manner of walking, stepping, or running; manner of moving on foot; way of walking or running 2. the particular way a horse or dog walks or runs

gallant: 1. (of a person or their behavior) brave and noble; high-spirited and daring 2. (of a man) courteously attentive especially to women; chivalrous; flirtatious 3. showy, colorful, or stylish, as in dress or manner; splendid; magnificent; well-dressed

generate: 1. to create or bring about 2. to produce 3. to produce energy, like electricity

generation: 1. a group of people in a society or in a family that were born in the same general age 2. a period of around thirty years in which people are born, grow up, and have babies of their own

genre: 1. a category or class 2. a specific style used in works of art that share common features

globe: 1. a spherical shape; a ball 2. a map of the world which is printed on a sphere 3. the earth

grade: 1. a level or rank 2. a number or letter that indicates the quality of something

grandiose: 1. (in a good sense) large and impressive, in size, effect, grandeur, or extent 2. (in a bad sense) seeming or trying to seem very important, but really looking artificial or silly; pompous and showy 3. more complicated or elaborate than necessary

grant: 1. to give something to someone 2. to allow someone to have something 3. to bestow

grate: 1. to shred something, such as cheese 2. to persistently annoy 3. to produce an annoying sound through friction

gravity: 1. the force that pulls matter toward a center of attraction; the force that pulls matter to the ground 2. seriousness or solemnity

gregarious: 1. an extremely sociable person 2. an animal that tends to live in flocks or herds

guffaw: 1. a hearty, unrestrained, and loud burst of laughter

hyperbole: 1. a figure of speech in which the speaker or writer exaggerates for emphasis 2. an exaggerated statement that is not intended to be taken literally

identical: 1. exactly alike 2. the same as something else 3. extraordinarily similar

identify: 1. to discover 2. to equate 3. to recognize a person or a problem

ignorant: 1. not aware 2. possessing little knowledge or training 3. uneducated; uninformed

illustrate: 1. to show something or explain, especially by giving examples 2. to draw pictures that are to be used in a book or other written document 3. to represent

image: 1. a picture or a visual representation of something 2. a mental picture of something

immigrate: 1. to enter a foreign country with the purpose of permanently living there

immigration: 1. the act of moving into a new country in order to live there

impact: 1. a collision; the moment when two or more bodies hit 2. the effect that an event has on a person; an influence

implement: 1. to put something in force or into effect 2. to carry out

impose: 1. to force people to comply with a rule or to accept something 2. to demand

impudence: the quality of being offensively bold; offensively bold behavior; impertinence

impudent: 1. insolent 2. rude towards others 3. disrespectful toward someone that should receive respect

incantation: 1. a spell that is chanted and believed to have magical powers 2. words considered to do magic when they are chanted

incentive: 1. something that motivates people to do something or take action 2. a reward or the threat of punishment that inspires people to act

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income: 1. money that one receives in exchange for one's work or smart investing 2. revenue 3. a company's profits

incredulous: 1. unwilling or unable to believe something, and usually showing this; doubting; skeptical 2. showing doubt or disbelief 3. incredible; not easy to be believed

index: 1. an alphabetical list showing all that is included in a book or a larger document 2. an alphabetical list of the documents in a collection 3. an indication

indicate: 1. to show 2. to be a sign of 3. to signal 4. to suggest

individual: 1. a single human being 2. a person

infer: form an opinion or guess that something is true by reasoning, especially based on known facts, evidence, or premises

innovation: 1. the use of something new; a change to a particular process

insert: 1. to put or place something in something else 2. to add something

inspect: 1. to carefully examine something, especially in search of problems or flaws 2. to make an official visit to ensure that rules are being followed or complied with

integrity: 1. the quality of being honest and having strong moral principles 2. the quality or state of being whole and undivided 3. the quality or state of being unimpaired; soundness

intend: plan

intense: 1. acute 2. very strong; extreme 3. profound

interact: 1. to communicate with and react to another human 2. to act on

interpret: 1. to understand something in a certain way 2. to explain something or make it possible to understand 3. to convert someone's spoken words into another language

interpretation: 1. explanation 2. definition 3. the act of orally translating from one language to another

investigate: 1. to thoroughly examine something 2. to explore a topic in order to learn the truth about it 3. to try to get information about something

investigation: 1. research or inquiry 2. the act of trying to find information about something in order to better understand it

irony: a method of humorous or subtly sarcastic expression in which the intended meaning of the words is different from and often opposite to their literal meaning

irreverent: having or showing a lack of seriousness or respect for official, important, or holy things that are generally taken seriously

isolate: 1. to seclude someone or something 2. to place something in quarantine 3. to separate something or someone

isolated: 1. separated from others 2. occurring just one time

jaunt: 1. a short trip or journey taken for fun or pleasure

journal: 1. a newspaper or magazine 2. a magazine that contains articles about a specific subject 3. a written record of the day 4. a logbook

jovial: 1. (of a person ) cheerful, friendly, and good-humored 2. (of a situation ) enjoyable because of being friendly and pleasant

jubilant: 1. thrilled 2. feeling and expressing great joy 3. expressing extreme happiness, often due to a victory or success

juxtaposition: 1. the act of placing items side-by-side 2. the act of placing items close together, often to incite comparison

kindle: 1. to build or light a fire 2. to make something burn; to ignite 3. to arouse an emotion or cause a feeling 4. to stir up

label: 1. a piece of material on an object that gives information about the object 2. a name or phrase assigned to a person to classify them, often in an unfair manner 3. a company that produces music

laconic: using very few words in speech, writing, or expression; terse; concise

lavish: 1. extravagant or expensive 2. liberal in one's spending or giving of money 3. impressive 4. generous 5. sumptuous

layer: 1. different tiers that make something up 2. a thin sheet of a certain substance 3. a substance that is above or under another substance

legend: 1. the part of a map or a chart where each symbol or color are explained 2. a story that has been told over generations that may or may not be true; myth

limpid: 1. transparent; clear 2. easily intelligible 3. serene and without worry

link: 1. to connect two or more things 2. to relate things 3. to join

locate: 1. to find 2. to situate 3. to be in a certain place 4. to discover the exact position

location: 1. the place where someone or something can be found 2. place

loquacious: tending to talk a lot or too much

ludicrous: 1. absurd 2. laughable; deserving of or causing laughter 3. ridiculous

maintain: 1. to keep something at the same level, rate or condition 2. to continue 3. to firmly declare or assert

maintenance: 1. financial support given from one ex-spouse to another 2. upkeep 3. the act of maintaining

major: 1. quite important 2. serious 3. large 4. more important

malady: 1. an illness, disease or ailment 2. a major problem

manipulate: 1. to change or modify, especially to suit one's purposes 2. to handle 3. to influence or control someone

margin: 1. a border or edge 2. the difference between the cost of production of a good and the amount at which it is sold

martinet: 1. a person who demands that others follow the laws or rules exactly 2. an extremely strict person

mature: 1. to grow old 2. to develop 3. to ripen

medium: 1. a way of expressing something, such as photography or print 2. something in a middle position 3. surrounding objects; environment

mental: 1. related to or involving the mind 2. existing in the mind

merge: 1. to put two or more things together; to unite; to combine

method: 1. a way of doing something 2. an approach 3. a technique

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migrate: 1. to move from one region or country to another

migration: 1. the movement of people or animals from one reason to another, based on a variety of different reasons

minimal: 1. the least or fewest possible 2. extremely small 3. negligible

minor: 1. of little importance 2. small or secondary 3. not valuable 4. not serious

minute: extremely small

mire: 1. to entangle or trap 2. to cause to stick or get stuck 3. to soil or stain with mud

mode: 1. a fashion 2. a way of doing something or performing a task

modify: 1. to make changes to something 2. to adjust or alter

monitor: 1. to watch someone or something 2. to check on something or someone in order to detect changes 3. to supervise

motive: 1. one of the reasons behind someone's behavior 2. something that inspires someone to behave in a certain way 3. a motif

negative: 1. pessimistic 2. harmful or bad 3. expressing or showing "no" 4. expressing disapproval

network: 1. a large system of smaller interconnected parts 2. a system of interconnected people or things 3. a group of people who are related in some way

nevertheless: 1. in spite of 2. notwithstanding 3. however

nonchalant: coolly unconcerned, indifferent, or unexcited; relaxed, calm, and not worried about anything; not displaying anxiety, interest, or enthusiasm

norm: 1. a rule or standard 2. a pattern or something that is expected 3. a model

novel: 1. new 2. different from anything that has previously existed 3. surprisingly new or unusual

obstreperous: 1. noisy and unruly, often in an aggressive way 2. resistant to authority; defiant

obtain: 1. to get 2. to acquire 3. to procure

occupy: 1. to be inside something 2. to dwell in 3. to fill 4. to keep someone busy

occur: 1. to take place 2. to happen 3. to exist

odd: 1. unable to be divided by two 2. strange or uncommon 3. unexpected

ominous: 1. threatening or suggestive that something bad is going to occur 2. inauspicious

omnipotent: 1. possessing infinite power 2. having an enormous influence 3. all-powerful

opaque: 1. not letting light pass through; not transparent or translucent 2. difficult to understand or explain

oracle: 1. a message or answer from God 2. a message, order or response communicated by God to the prophets

orientation: 1. the act of finding or determining one's position 2. a person or group's interests or beliefs 3. training for a job

outcome: 1. the result or consequence 2. the effect

overall: 1. comprehensive 2. all-inclusive 3. total 4. in general

panacea: 1. a cure for any malady 2. something that people think will cure any difficulty or problem

paragraph: 1. a portion of a text that centers around one specific idea

parallel: 1. not intersecting 2. occurring at the same time 3. extending in the same direction

percent: 1. out of one hundred 2. a part of one hundred

period: 1. an interval or length of time 2. a full stop

perspective: 1. a vista or view 2. a way of looking at or examining something 3. an outlook

pervasive: 1. spread all over or spreading to all parts 2. present everywhere 3. permeating; penetrating

petrify: 1. to make something become hard or stone like 2. to freeze with horror or fear 3. to make hard or inflexible

phenomenon: 1. an extraordinary person or thing 2. an observable fact or occurrence 3. something remarkable

philosophy: 1. the study of human morals and behavior 2. ideas and theories about something 3. the way someone thinks about life 4. a theory or belief that guides someone's behavior

physical: 1. related to the body 2. related to something one can see and touch; tangible

pinnacle: 1. the peak 2. the highest point 3. a tall and pointed formation 4. the most important or successful part of a person's life

placate: make (someone) less angry or hostile, especially by making concessions or by being nice to them

plastic: (of substances or materials) capable of being molded or shaped

plumage: 1. the feathers of a bird (collectively) 2. elaborate costume or dress

plummet: 1. to fall suddenly or drastically 2. to plunge

policy: 1. a course of action decided upon by an organization, a group of people, a government or a political party 2. guidelines

portion: 1. a small part or section of something whole; a piece 2. the specific amount of food given to someone

pose: 1. to take on a posture for artistic purposes 2. to formally ask a question 3. to cause a problem 4. to impersonate someone

positive: 1. extremely certain, without any doubt 2. more than zero 3. hopeful or giving reasons to be so

practice: the expected procedure or way of doing something

pragmatic: dealing or concerned with facts or actual practice in a reasonable and logical way instead of depending on ideas, theories or speculation; practical

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prattle: 1. to speak at length about subjects that are unimportant, often without making any sense 2. to speak without sense and in a juvenile manner

precinct: 1. a division of a city for policing or political reasons 2. a specific area which is enclosed or limited, most often by walls

precise: 1. accurate; exact 2. meticulous or exacting

precocious: 1. (especially of children) unusually advanced or mature in development, especially mental development 2. appearing or developing early

predict: 1. to say that something is going to happen before it actually does 2. to foretell 3. to announce in advance

presume: 1. to believe something is true, despite not knowing whether or not it is 2. to act in a certain way, even though you don't have the right to behave that way

prime: 1. chief 2. most important 3. of the highest quality

procedure: 1. a way of doing something 2. a medical treatment 3. course of action

proceed: 1. to continue onward 2. to advance 3. to begin something

process: 1. a series of happenings or actions that lead to a specific result 2. a naturally occurring series of changes

prodigious: 1. very great or impressive in size, force, or extent; enormous 2. extraordinary; marvelous; wonderful; amazing

profane: 1. to defile 2. to show a lack of respect for objects considered to be sacred or holy 3. to violate

professional: 1. relating to or suitable for a specific profession 2. performing an activity to earn money instead of to relax or have fun 3. possessing the necessary qualities

prohibit: 1. to forbid or ban 2. to not allow or permit 3. to officially ban

prolific: 1. producing a large amount of something, especially fruit, offspring or works 2. bountiful, fruitful or productive

prudent: 1. careful, and using good judgment in practical matters 2. careful in regard to one's own interests; provident 3. cautious or discreet in conduct; circumspect; not rash

publish: 1. to make a document available in digital or print format 2. to make something public or known

quaint: 1. picturesque 2. old-fashioned 3. interesting or appealing yet quirky in an old-fashioned way

quarry: 1. an open-air pit from which rock is excavated 2. a person or animal being hunted or searched for

quell: 1. to suppress or stop something, especially through the use of force 2. to pacify or soothe a previously problematic situation

quixotic: having or showing ideas, plans, hope, etc. that are not practical or likely to succeed; unrealistic and impractical

quotation: 1. specific words that have been directly taken from a certain source 2. the act of using someone else's words

quote: 1. to repeat someone else's words 2. to say something that has previously been said or written

radical: 1. extreme; drastic 2. supporting drastic changes 3. very important 4. new and different

ramble: 1. to walk about or move about in an aimless manner 2. to follow a winding path 3. to write or talk in an aimless, uncontrolled manner 4. to stroll or walk for pleasure

range: 1. a set of things that are similar 2. the upper and lower limits 3. the period of time in which something can happen

rant: 1. to talk or write in an excited, hurried or violent manner

rash: 1. not cautious 2. acting without pausing to think 3. reckless

raucous: loud, harsh, and disturbing noise

raze: 1. completely destroy a city, building, etc. 2. scrape or shave off; erase

react: 1. to respond to a stimulus 2. to act in opposition 3. to change in response to a specific stimulus

rebuttal: the act of proving that something is not true by using arguments or evidence; response with contrary evidence

recover: 1. to get something back 2. to reclaim 3. to recuperate from an injury or illness

redundant: 1. superfluous 2. unnecessarily wordy 3. not needed

region: 1. a specific part of the world; a large area of land where the people or land possesses similar characteristics 2. a district 3. a part of the body

register: 1. to record something in writing 2. to enroll a student in a school 3. to express or show 4. to convey

reject: 1. to refuse something 2. to turn something down 3. to decline

relax: 1. to stop doing something in order to rest 2. to slacken or make less rigid 3. to make less severe 4. to calm

release: 1. to let go or free 2. to emancipate 3. to allow something to flow freely 4. to make information available to the public

relevant: 1. related to the issue being discussed or debated 2. pertinent 3. connected to an issue

relinquish: 1. give up (something, such as power, control, or possession), especially when you do not want to do this; retire from; abandon 2. surrender 3. let go (a grasp, hold, etc.)

reproach: express disapproval of, criticism of, or disappointment in (someone), especially for not being successful or not doing what is expected

research: 1. to investigate 2. to make inquiries in order to find out information 3. to carefully study something in order to find out new information

reside: 1. to inhabit 2. to live in a certain place 3. to exist

resolution: 1. a decision that is made by a group through a voting process 2. a personal promise to oneself 3. a formal statement of intent or opinion

resolve: 1. firm or strong determination 2. a resolution made by a legislative body; a ruling

resource: 1. material used to do or make something 2. a supply of something that can be used when required 3. a country's tools for generating wealth

retain: 1. to remember information 2. to hold or keep someone or something 3. to hire someone by paying them an initial fee

reveal: 1. to show or disclose 2. to divulge 3. to make known

revenue: 1. income 2. money that an organization, government or company receives from different sources

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revise: 1. to check something and make changes to make sure that it is acceptable 2. to change or amend 3. to alter

revolution: 1. a huge change in something, such as a political organization or country 2. the circular movement around a certain celestial body 3. a complete cycle 4. a very important change in the way people act

robust: 1. healthy 2. hardy or strong 3. sturdy and able to withstand detrimental conditions 4. successful

role: 1. the part that a performer in theater acts out 2. one's proper function in society 3. a person's function

scale: 1. to climb a surface that is steep 2. to set something according to a scale or measure something by a scale 3. to remove something in layers or scales

section: 1. a piece of something 2. a part of a whole object 3. a smaller part of a book or a newspaper

select: 1. preferred 2. of a special value or importance 3. exclusive 4. discriminating 5. only the best

sentinel: 1. a person or an animal that guards a certain location 2. a sentry; someone who keeps watch

sequence: 1. the order or pattern in which things happen or take place 2. a set of things that is put in a specific order

serene: 1. tranquil, peaceful or calm 2. bright or clear 3. untroubled or unaffected

series: 1. a sequence of things 2. a set of related objects 3. a collection of episodes of a television show that use the same characters in different situations

shrewd: having or showing sharp powers to understand things and to make good judgments in practical affairs; astute

similar: 1. related to something else 2. nearly the same, but not exactly the same 3. comparable

simile: (the use of) a phrase that describes something by comparing it to something else, always including the words 'as' or 'like'

site: 1. a place where something can be found or where something is located

skirmish: 1. a short or small battle 2. a minor fight in a much larger conflict 3. a squabble or a short argument

slight: 1. small in size, degree, or amount 2. treat with disrespect or indifference; treat as unimportant

sole: 1. the bottom part of a foot or shoe 2. the bottom part of an object such as a golf club or a plow

somber: 1. very sad and serious; gloomy; depressing or grave 2. dull or dark in color, especially grey or black

source: 1. the place in which something originates or which someone comes from 2. a point or place of origin 3. a person who provides information

sphere: 1. a globe; a ball shaped object 2. an area of knowledge, study or expertise

stable: 1. constant 2. unwavering 3. strongly fixed 4. firmly established

stagnant: 1. (of water or air ) not flowing or moving, and often smells bad 2. not active, changing, or progressing

staid: of a settled, unadventurous, sedate, and steady but boring character

stanza: 1. a part of a poem that is presented in paragraph form

steadfast: 1. very committed or loyal to a person, belief, or cause 2. not changing, fickle, or wavering; constant

structure: 1. a free-standing building made from different parts 2. the way in which something is organized 3. the quality of being organized

strut: 1. to walk about in a proud manner 2. to swagger

stupefy: 1. make (someone) confused or unable to think or feel properly 2. shock or surprise (someone) very much; amaze; astonish

style: 1. a way of doing or expressing something 2. fashion 3. quality or attractiveness in design

subsequent: 1. following 2. succeeding 3. happening after something else

subtle: 1. thin, tenuous, or rarefied, as a fluid or an odor 2. not obvious, and so slight as to be difficult to notice, see, detect, or describe 3. able to make fine distinctions 4. making use of clever and indirect methods to achieve something

sum: 1. the total of a calculation 2. an amount of money 3. the total amount of something in existence

summary: 1. an explanation of something giving the main points or ideas of the original document or argument 2. a recapitulation

superfluous: being more than is needed, useful, or wanted; surplus; excessive

surly: 1. rude or threatening 2. hostile 3. unfriendly 4. dismal or menacing (related to weather) 5. bad tempered

surreptitious: 1. obtained, done, or made in a secret, stealthy way, especially because it would not be approved of; clandestine; secret or unauthorized 2. acting in a secret, stealthy way

survey: 1. a poll used to measure public opinion or the incidence of something in a society 2. an examination of a subject or a situation 3. a careful examination of land in order to map it

survive: 1. to live through an event 2. to stay alive 3. to continue to exist 4. to outlive someone

suspect: 1. to distrust someone or something 2. to think that someone or something is responsible for a specific action or something bad

symbol: 1. a sign 2. a shape, object or picture which is used to represent something 3. something used to represent or show an idea

tape: 1. a long, thin strip of material which can be used for a variety of purposes: to show a location, to stick objects together, to serve as a finish line, etc. 2. a cassette or video recorded on a strip of material coated in a magnetic covering

task: 1. to assign a job to someone 2. to place a burden on someone

technical: 1. mechanical 2. specialized 3. having or requiring specialized knowledge

technology: 1. the use of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, with special reference to its use in industry 2. applied sciences

temper: 1. to neutralize or relax something 2. to moderate 3. to cause a substance to reach its desired consistency or hardness, often by putting it through a heating and cooling process

temperate: 1. emotionally calm and controlled 2. not extreme in behavior or language 3. (of weather conditions) neither very hot nor very cold

temporary: 1. limited 2. not lasting or permanent 3. passing 4. brief

tenacious: 1. holding firmly 2. that clings; adhesive; sticky 3. holding together firmly; cohesive 4. very determined to do something; persistent; stubborn

tense: 1. tight 2. pulled to its limit 3. nervous or stressed 4. rigid

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text: 1. a piece of writing such as a book 2. all the words that were said in a speech 3. written words

theme: 1. the topic or subject discussed in a book, essay, conversation, debate, etc. 2. a subject that is brought up frequently 3. the style upon which something is based

thwart: 1. to prevent something from happening 2. to hinder, frustrate or foil

topic: 1. a subject that is currently being examined or discussed in a conversation, book, essay, article, etc. 2. a theme

tradition: 1. heritage 2. behavior and customs that are passed from one generation to the next 3. an old custom

transition: 1. the conversion from one state to another 2. to cause someone or something to convert from one state to another

transport: 1. to carry something 2. to bring something from one point to another 3. to move goods or people using vehicles

truculent: easily annoyed or angered and always ready, eager or quick to argue or fight

tumult: 1. a loud noise that is produced by a large group of people 2. a violent or turbulent uprising; a riot 3. confusion

undergo: 1. to go through a certain procedure or experience 2. to experience something 3. to endure 4. to suffer something

ungainly: (of a person or movement) awkward; clumsy; not moving in an attractive or graceful way

unify: 1. to join two or more units together in order to create a newer, larger unit 2. to combine 3. to consolidate

unique: 1. special 2. being the only one of its kind 3. unparalleled 4. extraordinary

utter: Complete

vacillate: 1. to change opinions or show indecision 2. to sway or stagger in an unsteady manner 3. to oscillate

valid: 1. sound 2. binding 3. well-grounded 4. effective 5. possessing legal force

vary: 1. to change 2. to fluctuate 3. to alter 4. to differ

version: 1. an individual's view about something that happened 2. an adaptation 3. a form of a book or other object that is slightly different from other books or objects

vilify: 1. to slander or spread negative information about 2. to use negative language about someone

vision: 1. sight 2. the ability to see 3. a mental image 4. something or someone considered to be extremely beautiful

volume: 1. the amount of space taken up by something 2. an amount of something 3. the sound level

voluntary: 1. not obligatory 2. unenforced 3. given or done by choice

welfare: 1. the well-being of a person or people 2. financial aid from a government to a person in need

widespread: 1. able to be found in many different locations 2. extensive 3. popular 4. occupying a wide space

wretched: 1. very unpleasant, unhappy, ill, or unfortunate state or in very bad condition 2. poor in quality or ability; very inferior

The following simple English grammar tips and tricks will help you to learn and memorize English grammar rules and speak correctly. If you are on this site for English grammar practice, these tips will really help you. Let's start.

Invest your time in learning

It surely takes some time to learn English. There is no shortcut way to learn it. Some websites may say that they will teach you English in seven days or one month. These are false offers. Invest some time in learning and practicing. Your English skills will surely improve.

Speak, speak, and speak!

Try to speak English the same way you write it. Do not worry about grammatical mistakes. The more you practice, the less mistakes you will make and the more fluent you will be. So, practice daily and do not be afraid of grammatical errors.

Slow down your speaking speed

Your confidence will go down if you try to speak fluently from the very beginning. Give yourself some time. Start with slow speaking speed and increase your speed over time as you make more progress day by day. Slowing down speaking speed has another benefit — you will get enough time to make sentences in your mind before you speak.

The more you practice speaking, the more confident you will be.

Use Mobile apps

Luckily, there are many English learning apps available. Some are free and some are paid apps. If you are a smartphone user, you should install some of these apps in your mobile phone. You can at least install one app and start practicing. A mobile app is a very handy and useful thing to learn at your convenient time. You can start with free apps.

Install and use a dictionary app in your mobile

There are several free dictionary apps that will help you to learn proper pronunciation and new words. It is highly possible that your smartphone already has a dictionary installed. Use it or install a better one.

Try to get a good bilingual dictionary for better understanding. Besides using a mobile app, you can buy and use a good bilingual dictionary. A good bilingual dictionary is always a good investment for personal improvement.

Learn English idioms and phrasal verbs

Idioms and phrasal verbs are very common in everyday English conversation. If you do not know them, you may fail to understand the correct meaning of what the other person is saying. So, do not ignore them. Try to learn the most common English idioms and phrasal verbs.

Listen to news bulletins

Almost every radio and television channel broadcasts news bulletins. If you have a smartphone, radio or television, you can listen to these English news bulletins. Besides learning the correct pronunciation, you can learn correct English. Listening to these bulletins will also improve your fluency. This is a common technique used by English learners.

Read out loud

How does your English sound? The pronunciation style of some people is very bad. But there is a simple and easy way to fix improve pronunciation. Take a newspaper or any other script written in English and read out loud. This way you can hear and test your own pronunciation. If you are not happy with your own pronunciation, keep practicing and your English pronunciation will surely improve.

Learn new words daily

The more words you learn, the better you can understand English and express yourself. You may be surprised to know that learning only the basic words can help you to speak English that is used in communication everyday.

Learn sentences

Besides learning common words, try learning common sentences used in everyday English communication. This will give you a huge boost in your learning efforts.

Write every day

When you write, do not be shy of your mistakes. Try to write at least a few paragraphs, ideally at least one page. It is a great practice to use your newly learned words and practice grammar. This will also improve your writing skills.

Watch English movies

These movies will help you to learn proper pronunciation and improve your understanding of English. When you see how native English speakers speak English, your mind will automatically start copying the style. You can try to speak like them at home to understand the quality of your pronunciation and fluency.

Language swap

There are several websites where you can find people who are native English speakers and want to help your learn English if you teach them your language. This is free and can be a great way to learn from native speakers. Many learners are using this method and you should give a try.

Go to a mentor

A mentor can help you to guide in the right direction. She can measure your progress and suggest whatever you need to improve. You can regularly discuss about your improvement and weakness with your mentor. Oftentimes, she can help you. Your mentor can be someone who is good at English. She can be your school / college / university teacher, your friend or any person good at English.

Try to correct your mistakes

It is common to make mistakes. Every time you make a mistake, write it in a separate piece of paper. Make a list of mistakes. Check your mistakes from time to time and try not to make these mistakes again when you practice. These mistakes are clear and good indications of your weakness in English.

Give yourself time to think

Whenever you make a mistake, you should think how you can avoid this mistake from next time. Take time and assess your progress and weakness.

Be an advance learner

Try to learn advance English grammatical rules and vocabulary. Never be happy with your progress. The more you learn and practice, the better English skills you achieve.

Start with "Tense"

There are mainly three types of tense - past, present and future. Usually, verbs indicate the correct form of each tense. Besides learning tense, you should memorize some verbs too. Do not worry. It is interesting and easy to learn the necessary verbs.

Learn common pronoun usage

Do you know the difference between the common subject pronouns and object pronouns such as I/me, we/us, he/him, she/her, they/them?

We use subject pronouns such as I, we, he she, they when the subject is doing an action. Usually, we use subject pronouns at the beginning of a sentence. Example: I cannot remember the story.

But we do not start a sentence with object pronouns such as me, us, him, her, them. Example: Call him.

Active voice and passive voice

Many English learning students get confused here. In active voice, the subject performs an action. In passive voice, the subject and the object of a sentence swap to form the correct sentence.

Incorrect: The cinema was gone to by me.

Correct: The cinema was enjoyed by me.

Prepositions

A preposition defines the relationship between an object and its surroundings. Without the proper use of prepositions, your English will sound weird. Luckily, there are only a handful of prepositions and these are easy to learn.

Learning new words can be a matter of fun but you need to follow some effective methods to learn new words faster. Read them all in the list below.

Read, read, and read

You will find many new words that you need to learn in novels and literary works. You will be most benefited if you read classic literary books. You should also read magazines and newspapers because these are also good sources of new words that you need to learn. These sources often use high quality English that often contain both common and advance words.

Vocabulary wordbooks

In the bookshops, you will find vocabulary wordbooks that range from beginner to advance levels. You can buy one or more depending on your requirements. These books make it a lot easier to learn because these books come with a complete list of words that is suitable for your level.

Use a journal

During your learning time, you will surely find new words. Add them in your journal. This list will slowly grow. But this journal will help you to measure your progress and show where you need to improve. The journal can inspire you to learn more and faster if you find that you are going slow.

Learn some new words everyday

It is easier and more realistic to digest some new words everyday. If you are determined to learn some new words everyday, you will be surprised and happy to see your progress after a month. The progress will surely motivate you to keep using this learning method.

Use flashcards

Using flashcards is a common way to learn new words. You maybe know that you can buy flashcards from bookshops. Some learners find it easier to learn new words with flashcards. You should give a try too.

Set a target

Set a target that is achievable and realistic. Whatever happens, try to achieve your target at any cost.

Look up new words

Have you found a new word? Get in the habit of looking up words you do not know and immediately do this. If you leave it for later, you may completely forget about it and miss the chance to learn it. A quick way is to look the words in the dictionary installed or available in your smartphone. Another alternative is — look up the word on a search engine like Google.com and you will find the meaning of your desired word in several high quality websites.

Play some word games

If you search online, you can find several word learning games. Some of these games are developed in such a fun and entertaining way that you will not get bored even if you use them hours after hours. These games are not hard to find out. Vocabulary learners usually learn using crossword puzzles, anagrams, word jumble, Scrabble, and Boggle. You can try one of them or all of them.

Use your newly learned words

Take a piece of paper and make one or more sentences for every word you just learned. This way every word will be more memorable. It can take some time but it definitely has its benefits.

Engage in conversations

When you engage in conversation, use your newly learned vocabulary. It can be interesting because the other person will be surprised to see your improved vocabulary power / skills. Besides, you will be able to express / communicate in a better way.

Take vocabulary tests

There are several websites that give you free access to their website so that you can test your vocabulary. This website also helps you to test your SAT vocabulary, GRE vocabulary, IELTS vocabulary, TOEFL vocabulary, ACT vocabulary, TOEIC vocabulary, GMAT vocabulary, PTE vocabulary, ECPE vocabulary, MELAB vocabulary, MCAT vocabulary, and PCAT vocabulary.